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Sign up to discover independent brands, makers and products from around the globe.

Subscribers receive exclusive discounts and are shown where and how to buy hard to find products. We'll never share your information and you can unsubscribe anytime with a single click.

How It Works

Each week Craft Movement sends out an email introducing you to five or more unique craftsman and artisan businesses selling products that you can buy online. These range from handwoven Alpaca blankets made by local weavers in the high Peruvian Andes to Japanese brass kitchen utensils, to fresh sage and cedar smudge sticks made by florists in New Mexico...and everything in between. There's no fee to sign up.

How It Works

Each week Craft Movement sends out an email introducing you to five or more unique craftsman and artisan businesses selling products that you can buy online. These range from handwoven Alpaca blankets made by local weavers in the high Peruvian Andes to Japanese brass kitchen utensils, to fresh sage and cedar smudge sticks made by florists in New Mexico...and everything in between.

Our subscribers have discovered:

Living Threads

Subscribers saved 15% and free shipping with the online discount code we provided.

Amanda Zehner founded Living Threads Co in 2014 to help bridge the gap between female artisan weavers in Guatemala and the global marketplace. Now in its 3rd year, LTC partners with artisans from weaving communities in Nicaragua and Guatemala to design and create each piece, empowering them through independent income.

These blankets and throws not only reflect fabulous artisanship, they make an impact and tell a beautiful story. Perfect for cuddling up to when it’s cold out, or giving this holiday season.

Learn more about Living Threads: Website  /  Instagram

Honeycomb Studio

Subscribers saved 10% with the online discount code we provided.

This small batch handmade porcelain shop out of Atlanta’s West Midtown district designs and produces porcelain excellency. Founder Courtney Hamill has been named by Huffington Post as one of the Top 15 Home Decor Trendsetters from the South and by Garden and Gun Magazine as one of the Next Generation of Southern Ceramicists.

Learn more about Honeycomb Studio: Website / Instagram

Berberwares

Subscribers saved 10% with the online discount code we provided.

This stunning collection of blankets, throws and pillows with enormous colorful pom-pom accents comes directly from the Berber villages that lie deep within remote valleys in Morocco’s High Atlas Mountains. As a bonus 5% of their profits goes to educate young Berber girls. Win win.

Learn more about Berberwares: Website  /  Instagram

Iverson Snowshoes

Subscribers saved 10% with the online discount code we provided.

Back in 1954 Clarence Iverson began building snowshoes for the State of Michigan using premium Michigan White Ash, full grain rawhides, and pure copper hardware. Not much has changed in the last 60 years – the snowshoes are still handcrafted on Michigan’s Upper Peninsula and are still bad to the bone. If you’re planning to trek through a shitload of snow this winter, consider a pair.

Learn more about Iverson: Website  /  Facebook

Catherine Rising

Subscribers saved 10% with the online discount code we provided.

As the seasons change and a chill is in the air, it’s always nice to scent the house with an old fashioned Southwestern smudge stick by Catherine Costanza. These bundles of sage and dried roses hand tied with vintage cotton floss are the prettiest I’ve found.

Learn more about Catherine Rising: Website  /  Instagram

Richmond Kettle Company

Subscribers saved 10% with the online discount code we provided.

Sorry, but there’s just NOTHING more British than this kettle company. I wish everyone in the world owned something this classic. Their craftsmen use traditional Edwardian methods to spin each one by hand. If you’re not familiar with copper spinning it’s a little like woodturning on a lathe – except with metal. Youtube has great videos. The finale of this outstanding handmade process is to create the kettle’s song, a whistle that Richmond is renowned for. To do this a small copper ball is woven into the spout. Upon boiling, the pressure of the steam pushes the ball into an indent in the spout, the steam then escapes through a slot in the lid and the kettle whistles its notorious tune.

It gets better… I just got word that they’re about to launch a limited edition of 100 silver plated over solid copper kettles to celebrate the royal engagement. This is so British I’m dying.

Learn more about Richmond Kettle Company: Website / Instagram